Ordered Universe in Early 2018: Events Update

2018 is set fair to be another busy year for the Ordered Universe team. In addition to submitting our first volume presenting the treatises On the Liberal Arts and On the Generation of Sounds, and the Middle English Seven Liberal Arts, to press, we have a wide range of other events organised. This is just a reminder of those coming up in the first quarter of the year.

The two exhibitions featuring work inspired by the project run over this period. Illuminating Colour, a major exhibition of new work from Cate Watkinson and Colin Rennie at the National Glass Centre, University of Sunderland, drawing on Grosseteste’s treatises On Colour and On the Rainbow runs until March 10th. This is a world-class exhibition – do come and see it in situ. And, if you find yourself in the North-East come along to the Dante Exhibition at Palace Green Library in Durham and see, amongst the other treasures, Alexandra Carr’s sculpture of the nested spheres of the medieval universe, and a film installation as well. Alexandra’s work was produced as part of her Leverhulme  Trust funded Artistic Residency at Durham University and Ushaw College focusing on medieval and modern cosmology.

January sees the fifth symposium of the current series, at Pembroke College, University of Oxford. In addition the OxNet course at Southmoor Academy recruits and commences its 6 week seminar series, to be taught to schoolchildren from across the North-East at the National Glass Centre. This involves Richard Bower – on Cosmology, Brian Tanner – on Physics, Joshua Harvey – on Psychology, Nicola Polloni and Kasia Kosior – on Translation, Cate Watkinson and Colin Rennie – on Creativity, and Giles Gasper and Tim Farrant on History and Religion. All co-ordinated by Kasia Kosior and the wonderful OxNet team.

February features a number of different activities. Tom McLeish and Giles Gasper are speaking on 7th February, on the modern and medieval cosmos, as part of the Dante Lecture series organised by Durham University’s Institute of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (IMEMS). Friday 9th February will see the Ordered Universe at the Cambridge e-Luminate Festival of Light for the second year in a row. We’ll be running a series of talks and then show and tell activities over the afternoon and early evening in the Guildhall in Cambridge. And this alongside Ross Ashton and Karen Monid’s new sound and light show. Keeping up the pace, on the 13th February IMEMS is running a day-long workshop on the Scientific Study of Manuscripts, Brian Tanner and Giles Gasper will be talking on Ordered Universe experience of interpreting medieval thought using science and humanities methodologies and approaches. Finally, Jack Cunningham will deliver a lecture in the Ushaw College series in Durham on his discovery of an 18th century life of Grosseteste. ‘ ‘Saving Robert Grosseteste – Fr Philip Perry’s Lost Biography’ takes place on 22nd February, 18.00-19.15

We wrap up the OxNet seminar course in March, and put all focus on the Ordered Universe conference in April – more on that soon, and look forward to the Ordered Universe/OxNet Easter School in Durham – focused on medieval manuscripts, the British Society for the Philosophy of Science conference, and then into the early summer and our Montreal visit, the Kalamazoo International Medieval Congress….and we’re already half way through the year!

De Luce

Empyrean – Ordering Dante’s Universe

Hell, Heaven and Hope: A Journey through life and the afterlife with Dante is now open to the public in the Palace Green Galleries at Durham. The exhibition features a fabulous range of copies of Dante’s works, as well as contemporary artwork. Alexandra Carr’s Empyrean features as part of the section of Paradise. Completed as part of Alexandra’s Leverhulme Trust Artist in Residence programme, the sculpture represents the spheres of the medieval universe, drawing on Grosseteste and Dante: sculpting with light on the grandest scale in the creation of the universe.  Continue reading

Lux mundi: Alexandra Carr at the Bowes Museum

Multi-media sculptor Alexandra Carr has a new temporary installation at the Bowes Museum, Barnard Castle, County Durham. Lux Mundi was commissioned by the George Harris at the Bowes, as a result of Alexandra’s period as Leverhulme Artist in Residence, a viewing of Lux Obscuraand the good offices of Jane Hedges of the County Durham Cultural Partnership. The installation will be up over the Christmas period and transforms the main staircase in the Museum. Lux Mundi dwells Continue reading

The Ordered Universe Project and the Being Human Festival 2017: Oxford Edition

Joshua Harvey, a DPhil Candidate in the departments of Engineering Science and Experimental Psychology at the University of Oxford brings us a report on his time as a ‘Lost Late’ exhibitor at the Oxford strand of the Being Human Festival 2017.

Oxford Being Human 2017 1

Last Friday saw 1,500 people of all ages congregating under a fabulous mix of lights, music, research, and dinosaurs. The event, ‘Lost Late’, formed part of the national Being Human festival, hosted by both the Natural History and Pitt Rivers museums in Oxford. From 7pm until late into the evening, visitors could stroll through the two connected museums, which had been utterly transformed into a realm of discovery, from mazes to archaeological dig sites. Continue reading

Illuminating Colour: A Guided Tour

1P5B8805For those that haven’t yet managed to get to the National Glass Centre in Sunderland, we have here a guided tour to the exhibition by Cate Watkinson and Colin Rennie. Rosie Reed Gold took the photographs, adding another level of interpretation to the movement from 13th century Latin manuscripts, to editions and translations, to textual analysis (by Continue reading

Illuminating Colour: New Work by Cate Watkinson and Colin Rennie

It is not often that you get to see your research used in the production of stunning artwork, but that is exactly the case for the Ordered Universe team and the collaboration with Cate Watkinson and Colin Rennie at the National Glass Centre, University of Sunderland. Opening this Friday, Illuminating Colour runs from October 21st 2017 until March 11th 2018 in the Main Gallery at The National Glass Centre. The fruit of collaboration across the project and the NGC as readers of previous blogposts will know, it is tremendous to see Cate and Colin’s imagination, hard work, skill, craft and learning come to the point of exhibition.

Continue reading

Through a Glass Darkly – More and more things to do with glass!

Work continues apace for the October 2017 launch of the National Glass Centre exhibition by Cate and Colin based on research from the Ordered Universe and the scientific world of Robert Grosseteste. The official launch date is 20th October and the exhibition will run until March 2018. A visit with Giles Gasper, Alexandra Carr, photographer Rosie Reed Gold (whose photographs are used here), and OxNet Southmoor Academy co-ordinator Katarzyna Kosior, revealed the riches in store. Continue reading

Colin Rennie – Video-Log1: Making a Rainbow

The first in a short series of films by Claire Todd chronicling the development of the National Glass Centre exhibition drawing on Ordered Universe research and the scientific works of Robert Grosseteste. Here Colin Rennie talks about his rainbow sculpture.

 

We are very grateful to Durham’s Institute of Advanced Study for providing resource to enable the making of these films.

Colour is Light: Through a Glass Darkly

Another memorable day at the National Glass Centre. Giles, Brian and Alex Carr, together with David Lowther (Leverhulme Early Career Fellow at Durham, working on the history of zoology in the modern period, especially of collections and birds), went over to Sunderland to see the preparations for the Grosseteste-inspired exhibition opening in October.  We also went to complete the filming for the documentary element of Through a Glass Darkly with Alan Fentiman. We had a fantastic time – Colin Rennie made one of his rainbow strands for us. As you’ll see from the clip below, this was quite extraordinary, culminating in molten glass being stretched and spun, changing colour as it cooled.

 

The final products of rainbow sculpture, some 20 or so, will be mounted in an steel frame, each strand moving seamlessly from one colour to another.

 

Cate Watkinson took us through her installations, with models of the larger pieces of glass in sequences. We experimented with torchlight and one of the circular moulds of blue glass, creating internal and external shadows, reflection and patterns at the edge of diaphanous media (as Grosseteste might have observed). Cate is working too on embedding Grosseteste’s treatise De colore (or parts of it) into glass, as well as the larger colour pieces and the movement from black to white.

The exhibition opens on 20th October – we’ll have more updates on progress and activities around the exhibition. For now, we can safely reveal that it will be amazing.