Knowing and Speaking – Launched

A huge thank you to all who came to the launch for the first volume of The Scientific Works of Robert Grosseteste yesterday afternoon in Pembroke College, University of Oxford. It was wonderful to be hosted by the SCR, and in the company of the Master and Continue reading

Knowing and Speaking – Launch

A lovely moment for the Ordered Universe project. The first volume in our Oxford University Press series on The Scientific Works of Robert Grosseteste was published 11 days ago, on November 6th. In a resplendent red dust-jacket (the beginning of a rainbow as the other volumes appear), the volume presents Grosseteste’s treatises On the Liberal Arts and On the Generation of Sounds with an intriguing Middle English re-imagining of both texts The Seven Liberal Arts. Nineteen co-authors, from the wide range of disciplines that characterise the project contributed variously to the tasks of editing, translating, elucidating, and analysing the treatises, and Grosseteste’s remarkable thought processes.

So, we have discussion of the evolution of the liberal arts as a conceptual and educational schema, discussion of Grosseteste’s location and circumstances – from the southern Welsh borders to (possibly) Paris of the first decade of the thirteenth century. We have analysis of his interest in music, of his mastery of Aristotle’s natural philosophy – notably the traditions of interpretation around On the Soul and the Physics, and his familiarity with Islamiate authors such as Abu Ma’shar. And, we have analysis of the sonativum, the sounding object and its physical properties and behaviour, alongside discussion of human vocal production and perception of phonemes. These are integral to the interpretation of Grosseteste’s intentions in his first two treatises, and their re-working in Middle English. The volume moves from the ancient world to the end of the medieval period, and to our own; Islamicate thinkers, Christian authorities, Ancient authors, and contemporary scholars, are check by jowl with the natural phenomena discussed, and the moral framework that Grosseteste sets up for learning.

The two treatises show Grosseteste at the beginning of an enterprise that would occupy him for thirty years or so, exploring new learning from the Ancient World, and medieval Islamicate, dedicated to the understanding of natural philosophy. The later treatises focus on astronomy and geography, comets, meteorology, colour, light, the properties of matter, and the rainbow, amongst many other subjects. It is unusual to be able to follow  the development of a past thinker from youth to old age; it is the case for the study of Grosseteste’s world. And this is a journey that we make in his company, and in his footsteps.

This then, is a special moment for the team and the project. We have brought together individual scholarship on Grosseteste into a creative dynamic focused on his scientific works. The project’s radically interdisciplinary ethos fuels its emphasis on learning without frontiers, from youth to experience, and from the university classroom to city-streets with projection art, galleries, schools, shopping centres, festivals, public talks in conference centres, cathedrals, societies, and pubs. There are so many people and institutions involved, and so many to thank for their generosity of funding, time, expertise, and insight. Now in its eleventh year, and fifth of major funding from the Arts and Humanities Research Council, Ordered Universe has developed a distinctive modus operandi, and a distinctive reach into sciences, humanities, and wider communities of learning and interest. As Grosseteste might note scale is not the key here, but intensity: all contributions, no matter how seemingly small, are vital to the outworking of what we do. And this volume, in this sense, represents so much more than the nineteen authors; and proudly so.

This afternoon we are very fortunate to be able to hold a reception for the first official launch of Knowing and Speaking at Pembroke College, University of Oxford, a few hundred metres or so from where Grosseteste would have taught in the early 1230s at the house of the Franciscans, Greyfriars. We are extremely grateful to the college for facilitating this gathering, especially the Master Dame Lynne Brindley. There will be further book launches and discussion of the volume and its implications will take place in January 2020 at the University of York, and March 2020 at Durham University.

Northern Lights returns!

dsc03702In a few days Giles Gasper, Sigbjørn Sønnesyn and Sarah Gilbert will be setting off for York Minster to join long-time project collaborators Ross Ashton and Karen Monid (better known as the Projection Studio) for the 2019 performance of Northern Lights.

Continue reading

Bishop Grosseteste University Associate Award series — International Robert Grosseteste Society

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All are welcome to attend this talk in the BGU Associate Award series. Programme Leader for Theology Dr Jack Cunningham will be talking about Robert Grosseteste and the ‘Soul of the World’. Dr Jack Cunningham Wednesday 23rd October, 2019, 1.00-2.00pm Hardy Teaching Room 1 Robert Grosseteste and the Anima Mundi In a tract called De sphaera Grosseteste make a […]

via Bishop Grosseteste University Associate Award series — International Robert Grosseteste Society

What’s it all for? Grosseteste on the Liberal Arts and Education, then and now. — A Bishop’s Blog

It was a great privilege and great fun too to be able to give this year’s Robert Grosseteste Lecture at Bishop Grosseteste University in Lincoln on Grosseteste’s Feast day itself. If the technology works you should find links to the text of the lecture and the slide-show that accompanied it below! https://bpdt.files.wordpress.com/2019/10/bgu-grosseteste-lecture-final-2.pdf https://bpdt.files.wordpress.com/2019/10/bgu-grosseteste-lecture-slides-with-copyright-notices.pptx

via What’s it all for? Grosseteste on the Liberal Arts and Education, then and now. — A Bishop’s Blog

Grosseteste on the liberal arts and education — International Robert Grosseteste Society

On Wednesday 9th October 2019, Bishop David Thomson gave a lecture addressing one of Robert Grosseteste’s earliest treatises. On the Liberal Arts sets Grosseteste’s thoughts on the arts subjects and emphasises moral concerns about the purpose of learning. You can find the video here. Here’s some photos from the event.

via Grosseteste on the liberal arts and education — International Robert Grosseteste Society

Congratulations to Southmoor Academy

Warmest congratulations to the staff and students at Southmoor Academy, the hub school for OxNet in the north-east, with whom Ordered Universe collaborates for the access to university scheme. The school are the winners in the Best School/College category for the UK Social Mobility Awards. This is a fantastic achievement and testament to the vision of the school and the model that it offers for broadening horizons and genuinely raising aspirations. Claire Ungley, the Raising Aspirations co-ordinator, and OxNet North-East administrator was in London, with other members of the school team to collect the award. It’s a particular privilege to work Southmoor and Sammy Wright the Vice-Principal, and to contribute to a now nationally recognised programme for innovative social mobility.

Sight Rays, Light Rays, and Bubbles

Next week sees the penultimate Ordered Universe symposium in the current series, and we are back in the wonderful surroundings of Pembroke College, University of Oxford. Our meeting will cover collaborative readings of the treatises On LinesOn the Nature of Places (these two really two halves of a single treatise), On the Rainbow, newly edited and translated, On Colour, and a revisit to On the Impressions of the Elements. We’re delighted to welcome new participants, in particular Sophie Abrahams and Joseph Hurd from the University of York, and Jack Ford from University College London. We have made the programme available on Issuu (below) and in PDF form:

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Enormous thanks, as ever, to all of those involved in the organising, especially to Rebekah White and the Oxford team, and to Sarah Gilbert.