Publication updates

A quick update on Ordered Universe and related publications: we were delighted to see the Compotus by Grosseteste, edited and translated by Philipp Nothaft and Alfred Lohr make its appliance earlier this year. To this we will be able to the first volume of our series on the other scientific works. Knowing and Speaking Continue reading

OxNet North East: The History Of History

The OxNet-Ordered Universe 2019 seminar programme concluded earlier this week with the 2019 cohort of school students aged 16-17 (Lower Sixth Form, Year 12) from the North-East. Students from Southmoor Academy, St Anthony’s, St Robert of Newminster, and Park View Academy, Continue reading

Through a Glass Darkly: Creative Collaborative Seminar

The next in the Ordered Universe Through a Glass Darkly Creative Collaboration Seminars with the National Glass Centre, University of Sunderland, takes place next week, on January 10th. This time we will be in Durham, at the Department of History and, to top the day off, at the Palace Green Library learning centre to be introduced to some medieval manuscripts. The seminar will review work from the Ordered Universe and present, in outline, the treatises On the Sphere – De spheraOn the Six Differences – De sex differentiis and Continue reading

New Members of the Ordered Universe Team

Ordered Universe has two new members of the team starting this month, whom we can  welcome officially to their respective roles. Our Administrative Co-ordinator Dr Rachael Matthews stood down at the end of 2016.  We all owe Rachael a enormous debt of gratitude for her tireless work in ensuring a proper platform for the project, rozgreendesigning the website and promotional materials, and allowing the academic programme to flourish. Rachael’s responsibilities will be taken on by  Rosalind Green.   Continue reading

The Wise Learn by Doing

The purpose and point of learning were questions that kept Grosseteste awake at night and dominate his surviving writings. From the treatise on the liberal arts, the first paragraph of which stresses the place of the arts in leading human operations to perfection by correcting the, to the sermons, dicta and later theological writings, the ends to which learning are directed are never far from the surface of Grosseteste’s thought. In this he was hardly unique, although his questions and reflections provoke particular interest. As Sigbjørn Sønnesyn showed in his fascinating seminar to the Durham Medieval Thought Seminar, the ways in which twelfth century western thinkers raised questions on the purpose of learning were connected intimately to their knowledge of, and engagement with, ancient models and lived experience in community.  Continue reading