Swansea: Rainbows and Colour

Last week, Thursday 23rd and Friday 24th November, Ordered Universe members were made very welcome at the Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Research, and the Department of History at Swansea University.  Continue reading

Ordered Universe – First Volume

The Ordered Universe team has been hard at work over the summer, putting together the first volume for a seven-volume series on Robert Grosseteste’s shorter scientific works to be published by Oxford University Press. The first volume incorporates the Continue reading

Updates on recent events: Montreal

It has been a busy month or so for the Ordered Universe, as we come to the end of October, and, almost a full year since the award of major AHRC funding for the project. Work is proceeding apace on the first volume from the project which will comprise the edition, translation and analysis of the De artibus liberalibus, the De generatione sonorum and the Middle English treatise On the Seven Liberal Arts. In addition a more scientific analysis of aspects from the De generatione sonorum is nearing completion – news and updates in due course. In the meantime, Giles Gasper gave two lecture in late September and early Continue reading

Space and Place: Ordered Universe Symposium

The next Ordered Universe symposium takes place at the beginning of September. From 1-3 various members of the research team will meet at Durham University, at St John’s College, to continue the programme of collaborative reading. The symposium will see the second reading of the treatise De sphera – On the Sphere, the first of the next text in our roster, the De diferentiis localibus – On Local Differences, and revision of earlier work with the treatise De liberalibus artibus – On the Liberal Arts and its Middle English translation. A full programme – complete with a public lecture by Professor Clive Siviour, Department of Engineering and Pembroke College, University of Oxford on his research into High-Speed Photography, and Grossetestes’s treatise De generatione sonorum – On the Generation of Sounds. This takes place in the Cassidy Atrium at St Chad’s College, from 5.30 and is followed by an opportunity to meet the research team, to explore some of the resources of the project, and to participate in some medieval and modern experiments.

 

Image of walking around the world, from Goussouin de Metz, L’image du monde, with permission from the BN, France, Fr. 1548, used with permission.

On the Utility of the Arts

A reminder for Durham-based Ordered Universe participants and devotees, that tomorrow we have a two-session On the Utility of the Arts on Grosseteste’s treatise De artibus liberalibus- On the Liberal Arts. Starting at 10.30 and finishing at 2.30, the seminar takes place in the Hatfield College SCR Dining Room. We will be joined by Faith Wallis from Continue reading

Unity in Diversity

IMG_404205125th – 28th November 2015, Durham, UK. A group of around 25 people gather for another symposium on the scientific writings of the 13th century English bishop Robert Grosseteste. It’s the first symposium under the umbrella of the generous AHRC grant that started in October. Whilst most academic conferences bring together experts from more or less the same subject area, this symposium is different. Its attendants span the academic disciplines from medieval history to modern vision science, from Middle English to computational cosmology, from church history to physics and applied mathematics, and from linguistics and acoustics to music composition. Continue reading

On the liberal arts and the generation of sounds

lumiere_postcard_21-1024x682Robert Grosseteste suggested in his treatise on the liberal arts that in all areas of human endeavour it is necessary to choose carefully the hour most propitious for the undertaking one wants to carry through. Plants carry more fruit if planted when the celestial spheres are correctly aligned, and base metals are transformed into gold more easily if processed under favourable planets and stars. We no longer believe this to be true, of course, and we may even speculate about the extent to which Robert himself gave credence to such theories; nevertheless, had Robert been around at the Ordered Universe workshop organised in Durham last week, he may have inferred that the organisers had chosen a favourable hour indeed. Discussions and deliberations carried much fruit, and base drafts were transformed into golden light of understanding. A liberating experience indeed, and one which generated the right kinds of sound! Continue reading

Robert Grosseteste’s Early Treatises and their Reception

IMG_0125OU logo large text 2015The next in the Ordered Universe symposia series starts today. The research group will be taking its final look, at least in session, at the treatises On the Liberal Arts and On the Generation of Sounds (De artibus liberalibus and De generatione sonorum). So, vowel shapes, musical measure, the powers (or not) of astrology, and Grosseteste’s rising familiarity with the De anima of Aristotle. Continue reading

Order, the Universe and Everything

This week sees the first symposium for the Ordered Universe project as part of the programme under the new AHRC grant. It will examine Grosseteste’s treatises On the Liberal Arts (De artibus liberalibusOn the Generation of Sounds (De generatione sonorum) and the Middle English translation and exposition of both The Seven Liberal Arts. Continue reading

A Guided Tour of the Chateau d’Amour: with video clips

IMG_0065Last week, on Friday 9th October, Michael Huxtable gave his lecture ‘A Guided Tour of the Chateau d’Amour’ as the Annual Bishop Grosseteste Lecture, at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln. The 9th, at least according to the Anglican canon, is the commemorative day for Grosseteste, and the lecture was given in collaboration with Lincoln Cathedral. Michael’s lecture, on Grosseteste’s wonderful, image-heavy, poem of the fall and redemption of humanity, could not have been more appropriate for the occasion. To a full auditorium in the Robert Hardy theatre, Michael presented a tour-de-force of learning and sensitive reading, placing the Anglo-Norman poem, its allegory of the Virgin Mary as Castle, and extended commentary on the redemption of creation, into a series of contexts. Continue reading